Intermediate Mid/High Make you feel better

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGPONsrpM-4
This episode has much to offer you. This is a series of video clips with the narration from the perspective of a young man between 30 and 40 years. The movie’s monologue told by an author himself, a prominent mainstream media intellectual, a writer and playwright Evegeny Grishkovets. The author affects the natural style of speech to better match the material. He assumes a self-deprecating, earnest tone, as if you’re a trusted friend to whom he’s telling his stories and observations. The experiences of life recounted in the monologues are not unusual or even eventful, but the way Grishkovets tells them, is a thoughtful yet folksy tone of what are random and somewhat philosophical musings that everyone has only never voice. These monologues’ brevity, visual impact, interesting vocabulary, and cultural components combine to provide you opportunities to improve your listening skills. At the same time, because clips are short, and tell complete "stories," they are good vehicles for the introduction and practice of such critical thinking skills as sequencing, predicting, making associations, and seeing cause and effect. A related benefit is the introduction of cultural values and attitudes. These clips provide you with a picture of the sociocultural context of the language. The author expresses interest in everyday life and is not interested in the role of a political or a social commentator, probably because of the feeling that political engagement is pointless. However, a closer look at this series shows what is important to the society.

To start, view the episode without sound. Answer the questions: Who are the people you see? What are their relationships? How do these people feel? Retell the stories. What happened? Subtitles are helpful, but not accurate!

Next step is to watch videos again, this time with sound. Take notes to verify or disprove your predictions. Finally, evaluate what you have seen, integrate information, and make judgments. Answer the questions: Do you think this series is an effective movie? What about this video clips attracts you? Do you think that liking this series is the same as its being effective? What this movie is intended to do? Relate plots to your own lives and values and make comparisons and determine whether and how these stories differ from those in your own lives?